Review of “Gay Girl, Good God” by Jackie Hill Perry

G I V E A W A Y 

Enter to win a free copy of Gay Girl, Good God!

I had the privilege of hearing Jackie Hill Perry speak this year as she travelled to share with a group of college students I get to do life with.  I was unfamiliar with Jackie and her work but very quickly taken aback by her craft.  She is extremely gifted in creatively wielding words to communicate a beautiful message.  I found this talent to be all the more evident in the pages of her book.  (Hearing her speak though, I was a little distracted by my concern that she would give birth at any second, but we made it through.)

Gay Girl, Good God.  This title captured my attention, knowing Jackie’s story in part, but knowing all the more how often I sit across the table in restaurants and coffee shops from students in my ministry who face a similar battle.  I shared with a friend recently that I am not quite sure why, but I have found myself to be a common confidant for those who are attracted to the same sex.  While this has never been a part of my story, I have found it an incredible honor to hold these precious people’s stories, hearts, wrestlings, fears, and frustrations.  While I hold this privilege, I have also held a lack of resources.  To know me well is to have been recommended a book by me, and I found this topic of Christianity and homosexuality to be limited in its scope of resources and all the more limited in individuals who would speak out about it.  And along came Jackie.

Breaking the mold of other books I had read which took an empirical approach, presenting data and family systems patterns from their research, Perry’s work simply reveals her own story.  She shares with great rawness the realities of same sex attraction, gender identity, body distortion, and sexual assault.  Amidst her rawness, I was consistently taken back by the beauty of her poetic word choice and language, presenting the power of nonfiction with the presentational beauty of a fictional work.

“I found my power to resist sin as feeble as a toddler trying to hold back a hurricane.”

Laced with vivd word pictures and humorous descriptions, Perry’s Gay Girl, Good God illuminates real parts of the balancing act of same sex attraction and Christianity.  She speaks of the fear of leaving the gay community, unsure of a true sense of family and identity she would find elsewhere.  Perry speaks boldly in the direction of Christian culture’s disservice both to same sex attracted individuals and singles as the Church often worships heterosexual marriage more than God and His true calling.  Perry boldly charges the Church to stop ostracizing these people, admit the reality of their struggles, show them community, accept marriage may not be their end goal, and do not let them settle for loneliness.

“I had believed when God looked at me, He was first looking to see a wife and then a disciple.”

Perry reveals in Gay Girl, Good God,  that her earnest conviction is the sinfulness of homosexuality.  Thus, her surrender experience led to her abandoning a homosexual lifestyle and over time eventually marrying a man.  This conviction is one which greatly polarizes evangelicals sometimes leading us to incredible conversations and sometimes to extremely hurtful ones.

No matter one’s view on Christianity and homosexuality, Perry’s presentation of the reality of her experience is not to be overlooked.  Furthermore, her experience of coming to know Christ and eventually entering a heterosexual marriage is not to be the goal for all who experience same-sex attraction.  Many of those individuals, should they choose to forgo a homosexual lifestyle, will enter a life of singleness, of which the Church must rise to the occasion to minister to.

Perry’s work is real, raw, compelling, honest, and a great launching point for the Church to enter significantly more honest conversations regarding same sex attraction, specifically in conservative Christian circles.


dalton-31My name is Emily Katherine.  On this page you’ll find lessons I’ve learned through my own story.  You’ll find book reviews and recommendations.  And in between you’ll find a few resources I use in teaching middle school through college students.

I would love to hear from you through your comments!  Click the follow button to stay in touch.

Review of “Garden City: Work, Rest, and the Art of Being Human” by John Mark Comer

Working in vocational ministry, I often feel like I have heard many of the messages on the purpose of work and rest more times than I can count.  Yet, John Mark Comer, author and pastor in Portland, Oregon deviates from these common messages, offering new insights on key passages in Scripture which reshape a Christian perspective on work and rest.

Many of my students (especially those with a deep passion for nerding out to theology) have told me to check out John Mark Comer and his books.  Upon completing Garden City, I attended Catalyst in Atlanta, GA and was blown away by John Mark Comer’s eloquence, relatability, and immense intelligence.  This work is enlightening, practical, and creatively constructed.

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Comer magnifies the two bookends of Scripture to piece together his thesis on work and rest.  He narrows in on key aspects of the Garden of Eden and God’s original calling and commandment for man and woman. He furthermore explains the concept of the “Garden City” to come or the New Jerusalem and how our lives will take shape in this future Kingdom.  Between the two of the Shalom that was and the Shalom that is to come, Comer offers a Biblical perspective of the role of work and rest in our lives and how we often convolute them.

“In a Genesis shaped worldview, all of life is worship.”

Garden City narrows in on the line we often draw between the “sacred” and the “secular.”  Placing one on a pedestal, demoting the other to menial.  Yet, John Mark Comer juxtaposes this predisposition with the life of Jesus who entered intimately into the secular and mundane in the fullness of the sacredness and glory of God.

“Sometimes a calling is staring us straight in the face.  We just need to make eye contact.”

He furthermore focuses on the idea of vocation and calling, a conversation many Millennials have wrestled with for most of our young adult lives, trying to pinpoint what exactly is our dream and how to go after it, especially when we are grappling with whether or not our dream lines up with God’s dream for our lives.  Comer explains that we, as image bearers of the Creator, are charged with the task of creating culture.  In this, I was taken aback by his relatability offering countless examples of avenues of work which can be worshipful whether its mothering, nursing, fashion design, hospitality, teaching, event planning, or marketing.

“Jesus’ way of living is about a seamless integration of life where the polarization of sacred and secular is gone.  All of our life is full immersion in what Jesus called the Kingdom of God.”

“If Image of God is every person’s job title, then cultural mandate is what we are actually supposed to do.”

Furthermore, Comer offers an unpopular charge to believers on our commandment to rest.  He elevates the role of our humanness and our limitations to remind us to take time to slow, savor, and taste and see that the Lord is good.  He highlights how Jesus modeled such rest and slowness in His life, while carrying in Him the fullness of God.

“Figure out what the work is God gave you to do and learn the art of saying no to good things.”

“Both underwork and overwork rob us of the capacity to enjoy God and His world.”

I highly recommend this read to all believers, specifically those wrestling with calling, work and life balance, or the Biblical call to rest.

Rest and the Brain

I will disclaim that Comer offers an interesting perspective on the ethics of military combat.  Some may be taken aback by this as I was at first as the daughter of a soldier, but don’t miss the main message at hand.


Thanks for stopping by!

Screen Shot 2018-10-12 at 1.57.56 PMMy name is Emily Katherine.  On this page you’ll find lessons I’ve learned through my own story.  You’ll find book reviews and recommendations.  And in between you’ll find a few resources I use in teaching middle school through college students.

I would love to hear from you through your comments!  Click the follow button to stay in touch.

Review of Pastor’s Wife: Strengthened by Grace for a Life of Love

 

Gloria Furman’s work Pastor’s Wife: Strengthened by Grace for a Life of Love is a message to all women who find themselves in the role of being a wife of someone in full time ministry.  She shares stories of times when many members of the congregation placed their expectations onto her to fulfill obligations she never imagined were hers, such as working to repair a leaking ceiling in the church foyer.  Furman and her husband pastor a church in the Middle East, thus gender roles are defined and experienced differently than in more Western environments; yet, Furman shares stepping into this role God has called her into with courage and care, especially as she has to work so tirelessly to protect her children and care for her husband who faces a muscular disorder.

From her experience as a pastor’s wife, Gloria Furman encourages other women to be aware of the many expectations the church will have for her.  She encourages women to have boundaries in place of what she is able to do for the Body and to always first prioritize her individual relationship with Jesus and caring for her husband and family.  She bravely suggests as a pastor’s wife to still seek out older women in the Body for mentoring and to allow fellow members to assist with children, when trying to attend to them while a pastor may be busy delivering a sermon or caring for a family.

Pastor’s Wife: Strengthened by Grace for a Life of Love is specifically helpful in honestly addressing many expectations pastor’s wives face with very specific anecdotes that help bring this tension to light.  Furthermore, Furman’s experience translates to a variety of global contexts for pastor’s wives in any part of the world.  On the other hand, Furman’s work is limited in directly addressing wives of pastors rather than all women in ministry and addressing wives from a very conservative context.  She addresses women in similar contexts to her own which prescribes a very small church with limited staff and extremely conservative gender roles.


Thanks for stopping by!

profMy name is Emily Katherine.  On this page you’ll find lessons I’ve learned through my own story.  You’ll find book reviews and recommendations.  And in between you’ll find a few resources I use in teaching middle school through college students.

I would love to hear from you through your comments!  Click the follow button to stay in touch.

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17 Books I Read in 2017

I said it last year that I’m far too bold to make this an annual post, but here goes another year.

Things you should know:

  • Books are listed in alphabetical order by the title, not by any ranking because I’m bad at favorites.
  • I do not receive any endorsements, just occasionally free books that I review honestly.
  • If you would like to purchase the book described, click its picture and Amazon will open in a new tab.
  • Yes, I do have a life outside of reading books.

 


1.) Braving the Wilderness

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To read my review of Braving the Wilderness, click here.

2.) The Broken Way

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I enjoy Ann Voskamp and especially love to hear her in person.  This book includes some great nuggets and quotes about brokenness and identifying with the brokenness of Jesus.  If I’m honest, though, I find myself lost in her writing style and have a hard time seeing the forest for the trees.

3.) Christians in an Age of Wealth

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I would have never chosen to read this book on my own volition, but read it to meet a requirement for my Christian ethics class.  Blomberg presented some interesting information on how many Christians do not give, not because they are unable, but because they have chosen a lifestyle that does not allow them to give generously.  He offered some practical steps to saving money both for individuals and churches, presenting modern giving statistics and how global poverty statistics could be offered if they Church is faithful to give.  This is quite a dry read, but good information if you are looking to learn more about this topic.

4.) How to Avoid Falling in Love with a Jerk

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This eye catching title provides precisely what it says, practical insights as to how to avoid falling in love with a jerk.  Dr. Van Epp works with the US Armed Forces providing seminars presenting his research in how relationships should healthily progress and signs of personality traits to avoid.  This is a very practical read that is based primarily on psychological research.

5.) Hurt

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This book provides good information and insight for all who work with or interact with teenagers.  Clark illuminates many of the hidden battles teenagers face.  While this book is beneficial, it is also 7 years old and the majority of the information presented is dated.

6.) The Inner Voice of Love

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This might be one of my favorite books I’ve ever read.  Nouwen, renowned theologian, faces the greatest challenge of his faith.  He journeys to a monastery where he openly and rawly journals his innermost thoughts in the pit of darkness, slowly inching back toward believing and accepting the love, grace, and friendship of God.  He never intended for this work to be published.  It is extremely honest and I wept through most of it.

7.) Love Lives Here

love lives here

To read my review of Love Lives Here, click here.

8.) Men, Women, and Worthiness

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I have yet to find this in print, only in audio.  Read my review here.

9.) Of Mess and Moxie

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I love Jen Hatmaker both for her honesty and out of jealousy of her friendship with Brené Brown.  I admire her bravery to speak up for the marginalized and oppressed and was excited for this read.  I have so enjoyed certain parts of it.  I listened on Audible and was deeply touched to hear Jen weeping as she read certain chapters.  If I’m honest, though, I stopped listening sometimes because of exaggerated mom humor.  While I serve as a “bonus mom” for so many as this book describes, I found myself not thinking many Mom jokes were funny and maybe its my own “junk”, but joking about Mom’s needing to neglect their children just strikes a deep and painful chord.  This book has some great nuggets.  Great ones.  But I struggled through it.

10.) Out of Sorts

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To read my review of Out of Sorts, click here.

11.) Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child

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While I do raise many children, I am not biologically a parent; yet, took away some great insights from Dr. Gottman’s work.  He describes how parents can interact with their children when they are afraid or pitching a fit by “emotionally coaching” or helping them to name the emotion they are experiencing and walk them through an appropriate response.  I LOVE THIS!  I hear so many parents or grandparents in stores or restaurants just telling their child to “shut up” or “suck it up”, then none of those parents understand why we need counseling.  What I especially love about this book is while offering this incredible approach to raising littles, Dr. Gottman is practical about when behavior simply needs to be disciplined and how to respond when you’re in a hurry and don’t have the time to properly “coach”.  If you have little people in your life, read this.  Naming and appropriately responding to emotions is the absolute best way you can prepare your child for adulthood.

12.) The Road Back to You

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It seems 2017 was “the year of the enneagram” in contemporary Christian culture (by that I mean modern, not like Michael W. Smith).  As an enneagram junkie, I have loved every last minute of it.  This book by Ian Cron is my favorite resource on the Enneagram.  Cron does an incredible job of concisely describing each enneagram profile, but most importantly unpacks how the believer should use the enneagram as a tool.  This is what sets the enneagram apart from most other personality profiles.  Rather than describing you, the enneagram is a tool both for understanding others and for overcoming the “mask” you have worn to survive.  The Road Back to You hands its readers large paving stones to create the road to wake up and toward becoming your most real, unfiltered self.

13.) Sacred Marriage

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Sacred Marriage is a common resource provided to believers who are about to enter the covenant of marriage.  While this context makes total sense, I felt as a single person, Sacred Marriage also had a great deal of insight to offer.  Gary Thomas’ thesis of this work is “What if God designed marriage to make us holy more than to make us happy?”  This book debunks many false understandings of marriage and the purpose of marriage, many of which are created and perpetuated by Church culture.  He was honest about the difficulty of marriage, while also illuminating its sacredness.  I think this is a beneficial read in any stage of life.

14.) Soul Virginssoul virgins

I read Soul Virgins as a resource for a seminary class and went into it with great expectations.  Single sexuality for the believer is almost never touched, while the average number of years between the onset of puberty and marriage increase.  I was highly interested in this read, primarily as I work with college students.  This may be a good resource, but I think my expectations were too high.  I was thankful the authors addressed this topic, but stayed too broad to have any true impact or voice on the topic.  Also, this book is a little dated.  The alphabet worked highly in my favor because the book I would recommend over this one in this subject area is next.

15.) Swipe Right

swipe right

To read my review of Swipe Right, click here.

16.) Unseen

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My small group of post graduate girls studied this book together this Fall semester and I absolutely loved it.  Unseen reads very personally and intimately, like most Christian living and would be a great solo read, along with a read for a group.  I felt met and seen by Sara Hagerty in the most beautiful ways on these pages, have recommended it to many college students I mentor, and will be closely on the lookout for any reads from her in the future.  I would recommend this book for anyone who feels forgotten and overlooked, for anyone in a difficult season, or for anyone interested in meeting God more intimately.

17.) You are Free

you are free

I know I fan girl over my Christian authors I love and I am not ashamed.  I am such a fan of Rebekah Lyons.  This girl is honest, fun, and when I saw her speak had incredible taste in shoes.  I loved You are Free and needed it in all of the best ways.  I greatly appreciated Rebekah’s honesty in talking about learning their precious first born would have Downs Syndrome.  Her word choice throughout the book challenged me to expand my vocabulary.  But most central, the message of this book empowered me to walk in the confidence of my Father in a season where every foundation beneath me felt shattered.  Read it, okay.


prof
Thanks for stopping by!  My name is Emily Katherine.  On this page you’ll find lessons I’ve learned through my own story.  You’ll find book reviews and recommendations.  And in between you’ll find a few resources I use in teaching middle school through college students.

I would love to hear from you through your comments!  Click the follow button to stay in touch.

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Review of Out of Sorts by Sarah Bessey

 

We sort through our mess on the threshold of change.

To know me well is to know my deep adoration of Sarah Bessey, not for her books alone, though Jesus Feminist was extremely influential in my life and story.  I enjoyed her work and commentary so much that I followed her on social media like any good millennial.  When I stumbled upon Sarah and her husband dressed as Sookie and Jackson from Gilmore Girls, the deal was sealed for me.  Sarah Bessey is one of my favorite Christian speakers and writers.  Beyond her love of one of America’s greatest TV shows Sarah is full of wisdom, interjecting Truth both to the global and local church.  She is a precious mama and her Canadian grammar idiosyncrasies grab my attention and wrap her closer around my heart in each read.

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To know me well is also to know how timely Out of Sorts publishing was in my life and story.  I had not yet purchased the book when news spread Sarah Bessey was coming to speak at the college where I work.  Upon the loss of my Dad and the grief that followed I had not picked up a piece of Christian literature in a while, including my Bible.  I was angry and lost but I knew I loved Sarah Bessey, I mean she dressed like Sookie, so I went and could not put to words how thankful I was.  She shared about braving the wilderness of doubts and questions, pressing into our wrestling and never feeling like we need to protect God.  It felt like a scene in a movie when the lights go off in a room and one single light was on me.  At a time when I felt completely missed, I felt completely seen and understood by her words.  I waited in line to speak with her afterword and shared about her voice in my life and story and how sweetly the Truth God laid on her heart had met me that night.

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But you didn’t come here to hear me fan girl about Sarah, you came to hear about Out of Sorts.


Real life is the undignified life and it is the classroom for holiness.

Sarah Bessey begins this book by describing the process of cleaning out her grandmother’s attic upon her passing.  She then opens up to describe the “sorting” of our faith and theology that grief brings.  Grief of losing a loved one, grief of hurt from a friend, grief of a divorce, or grief of losing a job.

She shares of her own journey of walking away from the Church for years as she questioned her faith while her husband was still working in ministry.

She unpacks the preconceived notions about faith and ministry she and her husband carried for years, without ever bringing them into the light of analyzing their true weight or faithfulness to Scripture’s call.

Out of Sorts is honest about the difficult tension of holding allegiance to the evangelical church amidst watching many actions and decisions taken and made in the name of Jesus and disagreeing with them deep in our bones.  How do we reconcile the Church we claim and the Church we are ashamed of?

She speaks of taking off the cape and crown of being a modern, evangelical hero and learning to be the faithful friend that brings over dinner when a friend just had a baby.  In a world that applauds those who take big steps of faith in obedience to move and sacrifice, she affirms those who stay, who brave it out in movements that are slow to change.

I believe we don’t give enough credit to those who stay put in slow to change movements.

 


I recently listened to a podcast by Annie Downs, in which, she encouraged us to pay attention to the trends of Christian books as they represent the heart of believers.  Recently, especially within women’s circles there were trends of bravery and courage and more recently friendship and finding your “tribe”.  I have found this idea of real sorting, of reaching back to the broken places to be a recent trend in Looking for LovelySearching for SundayOut of Sorts, and more classically The Inner Voice of Love.

We are in a unique age in the Church.  A changing age.  A time of sorting, reorganizing, and reorienting.  Sarah Bessey sets an incredible stage through her own story of how we on and individual level and collective level can truly sort our faith, returning to the often hidden Truths of Scripture’s true call.

 


 

dalton-31Thanks for stopping by!  My name is Emily Katherine.  On this page you’ll find lessons I’ve learned through my own story, primarily in the sudden loss of my precious Dad on my 22nd birthday.  You’ll find book reviews and recommendations.  And in between you’ll find a few resources I use in teaching middle school through college students.

I would love to hear from you through your comments!  Click the follow button to stay in touch.

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Review of Love Lives Here by Maria Goff

love lives here

I read Love Does a couple years ago and very quickly fell in love with Bob’s writing style.  I was pleasantly surprised to discover Maria employs the same style, sharing a story and example and tying it to a deeply profound truth that resonates deeper than you realize in the moment.

Since reading Love Does, I’ve found myself telling the stories Bob shared in lessons I teach and conversations I have.  I have already found myself doing the same with Maria’s stories and examples of Love Lives Here.

I think the best way to explain Maria’s focus of “Finding what you need in a world telling you what you want” is in a metaphor she uses.  Bob is known for bringing balloons to events all over the world.  He is a big, audacious, whimsical personality that I was shocked to find also works as an attorney.  Maria shared that whenever they go places Bob brings balloons and she brings string.  Maria does not similarly share of huge, crazy adventures.  Instead, she shares of loving her neighbors, friends, and family really well.  Maria talks about crafting a home where everyone who enters senses and feels the home and safety she has found in Christ.

“His plan from the beginning of time was that love wouldn’t be traded among the noises in our lives; it would be understood in the places of peace.  Sometimes when we’re asking Him for an answer, He sends a friend.”

Over the first few pages I found myself writing hearts all over the margins, underlining, and writing the phrase “DON’T SKIP THIS” before the foreword and introduction.

“Faith doesn’t eliminate fears in my life; it lets me know I had someone I could bring them to.”

Maria also offers great insight into walking into your own story and scars in order to truly love people well.

“What I’m learning is that the good news of our faith isn’t found in avoiding the pain, but in living through the loss, walking through the ashes, and stacking back up what we know could burn down again.”


“Preparing soil that someone can grow in is hard work, but it’s not all the work.  Preparing your own soil is where the most important tilling is done.”

As I read this book, I quickly began making a list of person after person to give this book to that I love in my life.  So if you’re reading this, go ahead and click here to purchase Love Lives Here.

16 Books I read in 2016

I’m getting a little audacious to make this an annual thing, but maybe that’s because that’s the title of the very first book I read this year.

(P.S. You can purchase the book by clicking the photo!)

1.) Audacious by Beth Moore

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Read my review of Audacious here.

2.) I am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai

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I am all about some girl power.  And while many believe gender inequality has been provided to all, there are still so many girls who need to be empowered.  Girls who have believed in themselves because one girl did, named Malala.  Malala’s story is eye-opening, touching, and moving.  Yes, I’m a little behind on this book trend, but I would give this book to any girl 10 and up for them to know what a privilege it is to be educated and what some girls go through just to learn.

3.) Steadfast Love by Lauren Chandler

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Read my review of one of my favorite books I’ve read in a while here.

4.)  Jesus Feminist by Sarah Bessey

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Behind on the book trends again, I know.  I grew up in a world where the word “feminism” was overwhelmingly hushed.  I was a little fearful of finding this book to be an angry feminist ranting about the Church and faith I love, but I absolutely loved this book.
Sarah Bessey shares of story of growing up in a gender neutral world, then navigating moving to the States and being placed under societal norms of the roles of men and women in the Church.  Read it and let me know what you think.

5.) The Sabbath by Abraham Heschel

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This is anything but a light read.  A Rabbi shares traditions and stories passed down within his family, along with principles within Jewish tradition that paint the picture of the deep value of the Sabbath.

6.) Looking for Lovely by Annie F. Downs

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Read my review of Looking for Lovely here.  Also, this summer I was invited by Annie to come attend a weekend in Nashville, TN walking through all of her important places from this book.  Annie is forever throwing a party for Jesus and it was a joy to be a part of.

7.) A Grief Observed by C. S. Lewis

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This was the first and one of the only books I could read following losing my Dad suddenly.  C. S. Lewis shares his very real and raw thoughts and wrestlings following having lost his wife to cancer. It put words to a lot of the depths I was feeling and if you have ever grieved anyone, read it.

8.)  A Heart Like His by Beth Moore

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This is a Beth Moore Bible Study on the life of David.  I loved how she brought David’s life to light and made it so real and relatable.  It can be done as a daily Bible Study as the chapters are around 4 or 5 chapters, but I got sucked in and just didn’t really want to sit it down as Beth made David feel like my best friend, she just made him so real.  I’ve since bought it for multiple friends.

9.)  Life Together in Christ by Ruth Haley Barton

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I am a big Ruth Haley Barton fan.  In this book, she highlights the value of Biblical Community using the story of Jesus’ appearances on the Emmaus Road. She wrote so many truths from this passage I hadn’t thought of before and made beautiful connections between this account in the gospels and the modern Christian life.  This is a great resource on the value of other believers in the Christian life.

10.) Conversion & Discipleship by Bill Hull

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This was required reading for a seminary class this fall, but I really loved it.  Bill Hull explained so well that walking with believers does not end once they come to know Christ, but that is only the beginning, highlighting both parts of the Great Commission.  Great read!

11.) Transformational Discipleship by Eric Geiger and Michael Kelley

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This book was similarly a book for a seminary class, but I enjoyed its very practical principles of discipleship presented.  The authors focused on how growth takes place in the life of a believer through various stories of individuals’ transformation.  Also a good read!

12.) Teenage Girls by Ginny Olson

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While we’re on the topic of seminary books, I absolutely loved this one.  While it is a little dated, the modern psychological research included sets this book far above many I have read on ministering to teenage girls.  It did a great job of discerning what ministers should encourage parents to reinforce in each stage and issue of teenage girls’ development and what is important for the minister to recognize.  I would say this is a must read for anyone who works with teenage girls!

13.) Present over Perfect by Shauna Niequist

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This book put words to transformation in my life I had just experienced or was currently undergoing.  I immediately felt like I could better explain myself through beautiful metaphors and stories used in this book.  I have continued to reference it since I’ve read it and bought it for multiple friends.  This book is all about showing up even when you’re imperfect and I think we all need to do so much more of it.

14.) Talking as Fast as I Can by Lauren Graham

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I listened to this book on Audible, which I would highly recommend.  Lauren Graham shares her story of how she so deeply identified with the character of Lorelai Gilmore in my favorite TV Show Gilmore Girls.  She watched every season and talked about what was going on in her life.  She shared a little about Parenthood and the shared more about the Revival with interesting details and beautiful stories in between.  Y’all these are my shows and I loved this.

15.) The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis

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I mean, just read this.

16.) Hidden Christmas by Tim Keller

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This was a good read for this Christmas, as Tim Keller highlighted many of the not so romantic details about the story of the night in Bethlehem when Jesus was born.  He beautifully wove a good deal of Old Testament anecdotes and details and did a great job of bringing the story to life while shedding a great deal of new light on typically overlooked pieces of the story.


So those are my reads from this year.  Comment below with yours!  Also, click FOLLOW in the left column for book reviews hot of the presses.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!